Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Friday, September 15, 2017, 19:37 (68 days ago)

After nearly 20 years of visiting the area and now living here, we had our 1st encounter with the Z transit cops yesterday. I made a U-turn on a green light in front of the bus station instead of waiting for the green arrow (my mistake). Immediately got pulled over by the "Transit" car I often see sitting in wait there. He pulled me over, he told me what I did wrong and of course I pleaded my case to no avail. Our Spanish is still in the "aprendiendo" stage but I soon realized he wanted a pay-off to void the stop. $1,200.00 MXN later, I drove off. My question is, he said pay or follow him to the police station. If I had followed him, would I have gotten off cheaper or worse? Thanks for any feedback! I grew up in the land of the "Sopranos" (NJ); so, hoods are second nature to me. But have never been shaken down here yet. And who does control (for a lack of better word)the transit police?

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Zihua Transit Police

by jaui @, Zihuatanejo, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 00:48 (67 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

9/16/2017

Excerpt:
...."$1,200.00 MXN later, I drove off. My question is, he said pay or follow him to the police station. If I had followed him, would I have gotten off cheaper or worse? Thanks for any feedback!..... And who does control (for a lack of better word)the transit police?"

That's around US$70.00, a bit steep.

As far as I know, fines, or "multas", are set in a tablero, based on the current salario mínimo.
I found this example, for 2017:
SALARIO MÍNIMO GENERAL DIARIO EN MÉXICO 2017:
$ 80,04
So, dividing 1,200 by 80, you paid around 15 salarios as your multa to the corrupt tránsito agent.

The only way to know IF you had gotten of cheaper or worse, is to check the tablero for the fine that corresponds to the traffic violation you supposedly committed.
I.M.O., & I am just guessing, I think you probably paid around double, or so, as to the actual fine that the tablero indicates.
Of course, you would of had the hassle and nuisance of dealing with that situation, so, maybe you broke even, taking that into account.

BTW: Did the cop ask you for $1,200 pesos, OR, did U offer that amount?
I suspect that a crisp $500 peso note would of settled the incident on the spot.

......As far as your 2nd inquiry, I think the Webmaster is the one who knows best about that.

As a side note, there was a checkpoint earlier I saw around 8:00 p.m., on Paseo de la Boquita, in the Plaza Kioto monument area. The trucks with a camouflage finish were running it, from what I could decipher.

--
jaui

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 09:18 (67 days ago) @ jaui

Thanks for the reply. $1200. was the amount he stated. I naturally started to think about bartering but was really caught off guard by the stop. I will have a smaller amount handy in my car for "next time". Unfortunately, was not prepared as my Boy Scout training had dictated.

Zihua Transit Police

by Charlybby, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 00:58 (66 days ago) @ jaui

I've been pulled over by the Transitos, $200 pesos, 100 for each. Gave us the station option but easier to pay. Your amount, I would've challenged & said ok, station. Lot smaller amt I guarantee!!!

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Zihua Transit Police

by Laura ⌂ @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 09:39 (66 days ago) @ jaui

Very steep. The transitos seems to be on an intensified run lately...maybe having to do somehow with current tragic events.

I agree that a 500 bill would have probably taken care of it without further haggling, if even that much (300 is a good standard in most cases). A good general rule might be to counter with less than half of the number they mention, with an expectation it will end up no more than around half. Feel comfortable to say with your most respectful 'tourist naivete' voice, 'OK officer, let's go to the station, I will cooperate of course, unless there might be a way to take care of it more easily for all' (cue to hint at 500 bill). Chances of them planning to go to the station are close to nil and the number will immediately drop accordingly.

The camouflaged guys are the army and that checkpoint would have been related to recent increases in narco related violence combined with the holiday. They are not engaging in the time honored task of the 'transitos' squeezing out mordidas for traffic violations.

hasta pronto,
Laura
Casa del Encanto B&B
Barra de Potosi

Our experience

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 10:15 (66 days ago) @ Laura

My companera bought a new but very small car about a year ago. Even though she is a local native I think she was soon profiled especially when I am riding as a passenger (she does all the driving.

She has been stopped 5 times. Two times she was indeed guilty infraction (like her bumper protruding into a no-parking zone), twice it was and obvious shakedown and once she pulled into the left lane to detour around street maintenance-failure to yield even though there wasn't even oncoming traffic nearby.

The first time she was pressed for time and told the officer. He offered a mordida-1,000 pesos. All she had was a 500 peso bill and he took it. And therein she learned her lesson.

From then on she carries a 200 peso bill plus maybe a 20 peso bill or two in the money compartment of her wallet. Four different times she has been "cited" and shows the officer her wallet and the peso bills. They have always walked away happy and so has she.

Mexico, and FRO in particular is a different culture. The rule of law is touted but often ignored. Live with it.

Zihua Transit Police

by Sandy feet @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 00:49 (67 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

WOW ..... that's high. A 50 peso usually does the trick.

He and his buddies are celebrating Independence Day on you tonight.

Sorry about that.

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 09:19 (67 days ago) @ Sandy feet

I know........I know...... I know....Thanks!

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Zihua Transit Police

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 08:43 (67 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

After nearly 20 years of visiting the area and now living here, we had our 1st encounter with the Z transit cops yesterday. I made a U-turn on a green light in front of the bus station instead of waiting for the green arrow (my mistake). Immediately got pulled over by the "Transit" car I often see sitting in wait there. He pulled me over, he told me what I did wrong and of course I pleaded my case to no avail. Our Spanish is still in the "aprendiendo" stage but I soon realized he wanted a pay-off to void the stop. $1,200.00 MXN later, I drove off. My question is, he said pay or follow him to the police station. If I had followed him, would I have gotten off cheaper or worse? Thanks for any feedback! I grew up in the land of the "Sopranos" (NJ); so, hoods are second nature to me. But have never been shaken down here yet. And who does control (for a lack of better word)the transit police?

I'm surprised after 20 years you don't speak better Spanish or read the local papers, because if you did you would know that that particular intersection and the cops monitoring it have made the news several times this year for their extortionist practices. If you want to live in a place with a rule of law, then it's up to you to set an example. You should've told the cop to give you the ticket. The only reason he was going to "take you to the station" was because he believed you were a tourist and that you would be intimidated. The man knows his psychology! It worked. Anyone else would've had their placa removed and gotten a ticket.

The chief of the Tránsitos was murdered in broad daylight last Monday in the busy intersection in front of the ayuntamiento. The presidente municipal is in charge of the department, but good luck getting his attention. None of us in El Centro or La Madera have had any luck for the two years he's been in office.

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 09:21 (67 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

Live and learn!

Zihua Transit Police

by katherine @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 10:05 (67 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

:-(

Fighting the system

by bouldergene, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 17:53 (67 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

To pay the bribe or not? My second yr here in 2008, I had a minor fender bender. The following is the account I sent to friends then.


A couple of weeks ago I have a minor fender bender. On the highway out of Zihuatanejo to Ixtapa (4 miles ) a tractor came to a complete stop in the left hand passing lane – no cones, no notice, nothing. Everyone came to a sudden stop. I was unable to stop in time and I clipped the car in front of me (also an American). We exchanged insurance and had almost finished sorting the thing out ourselves when the transit police came along. They moved us to the return overpass up the road and insisted I call my insurance agent. I admitted fault as I had hit the car in front of me). We waited around for an hour and a half before the insurance agent arrived and completed all the paperwork.
Just as I thought we had everything wrapped up, the transit cop said he was going to issue me a ticket, which fine would amount to $1200 pesos / $96 USD – OR – I could pay him $600 pesos $48USD right there and end the matter. I told him I would not pay a mordida (bribe) so he issued me a ticket and confiscated my Mexican drivers license, which I had just obtained a few weeks before. I did not want to participate in the corruption which seemly permeates Mexican government.
I went down to the traffic bureau today with a friend who speaks better Spanish than I do. The "Judge", a young kid no older than late twenties, said I had incurred three "infractions" – speeding, following too closely and damaging another vehicle. After arguing there was no proof of speeding and the circumstances for several minutes, the judge said he would reduce the fine from $2500-3000 pesos to 1200 pesos / $96. We argued that the fine should not be any more than the mordida the crooked transit police wanted, otherwise, the next time I was stopped, I would just pay the mordida, and corruption would continue. He relented some more and said the fine would be $700 pesos / $56 USD, if I provided documentation that the other car had been repaired. l never received any such documentation from my insurance company so we had to track down the local claims agent and secure the proper document.
After securing the document from my insurance agent, we returned to the judge, paid the fine and retrieved my license back. (Two hours time for all this).
I then asked my friend to direct me to the appropriate office to file a complaint against the transit cop. He told me not to waste my time. He said transit cops, federal police have to pay their supervisor to get better assignments or keep the cop car (rather than a foot beat) or for whatever. Anything they get above that they can keep. He said if I filed a complaint nothing would come of it. In fact, the person taking the complaint was probably in the line somewhere. Then, he said that the "judge" had also asked for a mordida. Before lowering the fine to $700 pesos, he told my friend that he would lower the fine to $500 pesos if I paid him $200 pesos on the side. My friend told the judge that was probably not a good idea to ask that of me as I had refused to pay the mordida the first time and was going to file a complaint on the cop. The judge finally relented and just assessed the $700 fine.
What did I learn from this? That one person cannot change a corrupt system? To participate in the system myself and save myself some time and money? Hopefully, there is no next time, but I think I will just try to bargain down the mordida and go on my way.

Fighting the system

by BobM @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 20:41 (67 days ago) @ bouldergene

Thank you for the cautionary tale. I have been shaken down in similar fashion over a trivial traffic offense and was curious what might have transpired if I'd decided to fight.

Fighting the system

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 20:46 (67 days ago) @ bouldergene

Thanks for the lengthy account of your experience bouldergene. For a moment, I was going to fight it but on this particular day at that particular moment, it was easier to pay and move on. Maybe not next time.
Time will tell. Thanks and take care.

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Fighting the system

by Laura ⌂ @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 09:53 (66 days ago) @ bouldergene

Your story really gives a picture of the complexity of all of this..deeply permeated system of corruption. Not so easy to 'just not participate'. The scenario you describe extends to all facets and operations of life in Mexico involving government. This is a deeply complex issue for all here. Many have pondered how it can ever be turned around and there is certainly no easy answer. For sure it has to be approached with as much information and insight possible about how it works in general and also to keep up with specific trends of evolving change etc..to know where you can participate in turning things in the right direction, and where you'd be banging your head against a brick wall.

Hasta pronto,
Laura
Casa del Encanto B&B
Barra de Potosi

Fighting the system

by Canada1 @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 12:59 (66 days ago) @ Laura

I totally agree, the corruption runs rampant in the federal, provincial and city governments and seems to have even tickeled down to transit police, locals have told me that Marines can be trusted...police not so much.

When subordinates see their superiors on the take they to try their hand at it as it seems so simple, some succeed others fail. Even restaurant owners play with the system paying staff their 80 pesos a day and once they have reached that all tips etc go in the owners pocket!

There seems to be no end to it and no correction in sight.

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Beating the corrupt system

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Monday, September 18, 2017, 10:38 (65 days ago) @ Canada1

I totally agree, the corruption runs rampant in the federal, provincial and city governments and seems to have even tickeled down to transit police, locals have told me that Marines can be trusted...police not so much.

When subordinates see their superiors on the take they to try their hand at it as it seems so simple, some succeed others fail. Even restaurant owners play with the system paying staff their 80 pesos a day and once they have reached that all tips etc go in the owners pocket!

There seems to be no end to it and no correction in sight.

I am aware of no restaurants that practice this, and I would be very interested in knowing which ones do if you can name any.

The other corruption you speak of requires at least two participants. I have lived here for almost 3 decades without participating in acts of corruption, including winning a 10-year court battle in which the gringo demandante spent millions of pesos bribing anyone he could to do me harm and help him win his case, which he lost. When you allow yourself to be extorted by corrupt authorities, you put a "sucker" sign on your forehead as well as enabling the corrupt authority, much as passive family members often enable an alcoholic or a wife or child beater.

And excuse me for pointing this out since it will certainly be misconstrued by some true believers as "America bashing" (which only suggests some folks don't even know the name of the country much less the wisdom of criticizing it objectively), but much of what we consider corruption in Mexico is perfectly legal in the USA. Especially buying politicians and political favors. Citizens United is an unimaginably corrupt law in most of the rest of the world, including Mexico. Icing on the cake of course is that a narcissistic morally bereft billionaire essentially bought himself a presidency. The biggest difference between Mexico and the USA when it comes to corruption is that Mexicans have no illusions about their politicians and public officials while too many U.S. citizens believe in a history of fantasies and in the phony posturing by their unrepresentative elected officials. But hey, once North Korea starts unleashing biological, biochemical and nuclear warfare in response to The Chump's taunts, the chickens will have come home to roost and the rest won't matter.

Have a nice day, y'all.

¡Viva Zihuatanejo!

Rob, you are such a funny guy!

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Monday, September 18, 2017, 14:46 (65 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

I always knew you could walk from the Marina Pier to the Los Gatos Docks without getting you feet wet-

BUT you have lived in Mexico for nearly 3 decade and never participated in any corruption?

HAW, HAW, HAW! Can I sell you a bridge in Brooklyn?

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Living by one's principles

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Monday, September 18, 2017, 15:33 (65 days ago) @ Gringo Viejo

I don't see the humor in your comment. Perhaps living by one's principles is more than you can muster. Apparently unlike you and too many other angloparlantes here I've made it a point to dominate the language and to learn helpful details such as how the government is organized and how to use the laws to my advantage. Knowledge is power.

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Living by one's principles

by Talley Ho @, Playa la Ropa/Silver Strand Beach, California, Monday, September 18, 2017, 19:12 (65 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

:megusta:

Living by one's principles

by Canada1 @, Monday, September 18, 2017, 20:25 (65 days ago) @ ZihuaRob
edited by Canada1, Monday, September 18, 2017, 20:33

I don't see the humor in your comment. Perhaps living by one's principles is more than you can muster. Apparently unlike you and too many other angloparlantes here I've made it a point to dominate the language and to learn helpful details such as how the government is organized and how to use the laws to my advantage. Knowledge is power.

Helpfull details such as how the government is organized and how to use the laws to one's advantage is wonderfull knowledge to have, and rightly stated "knowledge is power" in any life situation. Keep in mind that knowledge can and has been used rightly or Wrongly to one's Advantage through past years and decades. Not all have that "knowledge" secured!

Living by one's principles

by K&B, Monday, September 18, 2017, 20:37 (65 days ago) @ Canada1

I hate using these thing but I couldn't agree more

Corrupt particpation

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 12:53 (64 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

cor·rup·tion. [kəˈrəpSH(ə)n] NOUN

1.dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, typically involving bribery:
"the journalist who wants to expose corruption in high places"
synonyms: dishonesty · unscrupulousness · double-dealing · fraud · fraudulence · [more]
•the action of making someone or something morally depraved or the state of eing so:
"the word “addict” conjures up evil and corruption"
synonyms: immorality · depravity · vice · degeneracy · perversion ·
[more]

Rob, no one is questioning your principles or accusing you of directly engaging in corruption.
But,. let's face it, Mexico is around #100 on the list of most corrupt nations, U.S. tied for # 11 (the first ranked nations are Scandinavian and New Zealand.
My point being that you can "participate" in corruption directly or indirectly, knowingly or unwittingly and a host of other modifiers.

Example: If you supported Randy Cunningham (R)in his election bid then you participated, indirectly and unwittingly, in the corruption scheme for which he went to prison. No doubt we can all think of many instanes similar to this.

And of course, in the U.S. Congress we have an excellent example of completely legal and lawful example of corruption: Using one's position of power to benefit themselves: How many know that Congress can information gained in the performance of their duties to trade securities and yet not be guilty of insider trading. Legal corruption at its finest!

I believe you when you say you have never paid a mordida or crossed a palm with pesos to expedite action. However saying you "have not PARTICIPATED in corruption is a vast overstatement of the reality of living in Mexico.
A personal example: When my companera was stopped for an obvious excuse for a mordida, I sat as a passenger and watched her pay 200 pesos and we drove off. I would say I was indirectly participating in corruption. Judge it as you wish.otten with Hope this comes thru OK as I didn't proof it.

May have missed a point-

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 13:01 (64 days ago) @ Gringo Viejo

The mere fact that one lives in a corrupt country whether Mexico or the U.S. means you PARTICIPATE in corruption, not that your are guilty of.
Example: An innocent is grabbed as a shield by bank robbers. Yes, the bystander was a participant in the robbery but not guilty of it.

OK, I am off my soapbox and refer to one of my previous posts when I swore off posting on subjects like this.

Zihua Transit Police

by Mexalberta @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 09:14 (67 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

You should have made your donation to the Earthquake Victims instead of the Police Fiesta Fund.

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 09:21 (67 days ago) @ Mexalberta

Yep!

Zihua Transit Police

by wisconsinjuan, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 15:48 (67 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

Zihua Transit Police

by midalake @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 15:52 (67 days ago) @ wisconsinjuan

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.


There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D

Zihua Transit Police

by Canada1 @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 16:46 (67 days ago) @ midalake

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D

I seem to remember seeing sear belt signs in downtown Zihua?

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Zihua Transit Police

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 16:58 (67 days ago) @ midalake

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D

Yes, there are seat belt laws. There are also helmet laws for motorcycle riders.

Zihua Transit Police

by Choyera13 @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 18:46 (67 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

Guerrero is a lot different from Baja California Sur. Here they are not supposed to remove "placas" they do take your license though.Always take the ticket! I know people here who do pay transito 150-200 pesos in Cabo, but 1200 pesos takes the cake!

Zihua Transit Police

by Choyera13 @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 18:49 (67 days ago) @ Choyera13

Now that transito officer and hisvfriends will keep pulling you over for no reason at all.

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 20:53 (67 days ago) @ Choyera13

Believe me, already mentally and physically prepared for that.
Once a putz.......always a putz.......not!

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 20:51 (67 days ago) @ Choyera13

Took my cake! Have a great day!

Zihua Transit Police

by midalake @, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 18:58 (67 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D


Yes, there are seat belt laws. There are also helmet laws for motorcycle riders.

There is at least 6 people [locals] who told me there are no seat belt laws. If you can point me to something in print that would be great.

D

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Zihua Transit Police

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 19:24 (67 days ago) @ midalake

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D


Yes, there are seat belt laws. There are also helmet laws for motorcycle riders.


There is at least 6 people [locals] who told me there are no seat belt laws. If you can point me to something in print that would be great.

D

Not sure why someone who doesn't know the correct use of "there is" vs "there are" would question me. :stirpot:

I'm a local who not only has read the law but who has seen it enforced. If the ayuntamiento's website weren't MIA I'd show you the law in the Bando de Policía y Buen Gobierno. Título Décimo Segundo, Capítulo VI, Artículo 329, Sección IV
;-)

Zihua Transit Police

by Canada1 @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 13:02 (66 days ago) @ midalake

We were stopped last winter leaving Palma Real golf course. Our offense? Not wearing seat belts. Same shakedown, pay him 600 pesos or take a trip to the Zihua PD station. We just wanted to go to our friend's condo and have a cool beverage after a round of golf, so we just paid.

Had a few thoughts afterwards. 1) I could have recorded the cop from the back seat on my phone and I don't think he would have noticed, but if I showed it to the wrong official that could be dangerous. 2) There are seat belt laws here in Mexico. What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck? LOL seat belts.

There are no seat belt laws in Guerrero. Nor in Ixtapa or Z.

D


Yes, there are seat belt laws. There are also helmet laws for motorcycle riders.


There is at least 6 people [locals] who told me there are no seat belt laws. If you can point me to something in print that would be great.

D

Take a drive around downtown Zihua seat belt signs are Numerous!

Zihua Transit Police

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 13:56 (66 days ago) @ Canada1

Somewhere on this tread or another one it is stated there are seat belt laws for autos and helmet laws for two wheelers. How, honestly, how many motor bike rivers do you see wearing a helmet? How many drivers are using seat belts?

It is stated or implied in many posts that corruption is rampant and it is true in all aspects of life. From property deeds to chicos malos shakedown of business to transit police and etc., etc. If you are going to live here or visit just accept it as the cost of doing business here. You aren't going to change the world. Yes, you may have principles but try to stand on them and they will kick you off your soapbox and kick your a**.

Zihua Transit Police

by Canada1 @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 16:19 (66 days ago) @ Gringo Viejo

Somewhere on this tread or another one it is stated there are seat belt laws for autos and helmet laws for two wheelers. How, honestly, how many motor bike rivers do you see wearing a helmet? How many drivers are using seat belts?

It is stated or implied in many posts that corruption is rampant and it is true in all aspects of life. From property deeds to chicos malos shakedown of business to transit police and etc., etc. If you are going to live here or visit just accept it as the cost of doing business here. You aren't going to change the world. Yes, you may have principles but try to stand on them and they will kick you off your soapbox and kick your a**.

Hey, never said that I couldn't accept the corruption and I will continue to visit and deal with it in any way I can. If I have to bend and accept some corruption so be it. Also not looking to change the world so sit back have another corona and Relax!

My apoligies--

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 17:12 (66 days ago) @ Canada1

My sarcastic comments weren't aimed at you in particular just the board postings in general on this subject.

My apoligies--

by Canada1 @, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 17:25 (66 days ago) @ Gringo Viejo

My sarcastic comments weren't aimed at you in particular just the board postings in general on this subject.

Apology accepted :-)

My apoligies--

by John Redcorn, Monday, September 18, 2017, 07:47 (65 days ago) @ Canada1

I was driving down Benito Jaurez a few years ago and made an illegal u-turn. My fault, I was half way through the turn before realizing my error so just went through with it.

Transito was standing on the corner so motioned for me to pull over. I got out to speak to him and was offered to pay the fine on site or at the courthouse. I was just making a quick trip to the store so did not have an ID and only $20USD in my pocket. I informed him of this and he replied that the $20 would settle it. I reached in my pocket and tried to hand him the $20. He got a bit flustered and told me "No, shake my hand". So I did. Still not happy, he replied "shake my hand with the money"

I guess he wanted to keep a low profile on the mordida.

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My apoligies--

by Labrat ⌂ @, The Roosterfish Foundation, Monday, September 18, 2017, 09:21 (65 days ago) @ John Redcorn

That's Funny!!

Keith

--
Más Chile Más Mejor

Pay no attention
Just Another Tourist

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My apoligies--

by Ernesto ⌂ @, Troncones, Monday, September 18, 2017, 09:31 (65 days ago) @ Labrat

But True !

My apologies--

by HolyMole @, Monday, September 18, 2017, 16:28 (65 days ago) @ John Redcorn

I was driving down Benito Jaurez a few years ago and made an illegal u-turn. My fault, I was half way through the turn before realizing my error so just went through with it.

Transito was standing on the corner so motioned for me to pull over. I got out to speak to him and was offered to pay the fine on site or at the courthouse. I was just making a quick trip to the store so did not have an ID and only $20USD in my pocket. I informed him of this and he replied that the $20 would settle it. I reached in my pocket and tried to hand him the $20. He got a bit flustered and told me "No, shake my hand". So I did. Still not happy, he replied "shake my hand with the money"

I guess he wanted to keep a low profile on the mordida.

Here are two "Canuck Driving in Mexico" stories:

I went through a red light in San Luis Potosi and the transito standing on the corner waved us over. At the time I was trying in vain to negotiate Potosi's bewildering one-way streets in Centro and was very stressed. I explained this in broken Spanish to the officer, who neither spoke nor understood English. He actually then drew me a detailed map, showing me how to get to where I wanted to go. I thought I was in the clear, but, to my dismay, he then began to fill-out the traffic ticket. I asked how much the fine was and he replied that it was 660 pesos. When it came to completing the block that asked for my "estado", I tried explaining that Canada has provinces, not states. This seemed to baffle him, (or maybe he likes Canadians?) and he finally waved me off. No mordida, just a smile.

Driving coastal Oaxaca, just exiting the town of Rio Colorado Tututepec (I think), in a 30 kph zone, I made a sudden, no-signal left turn off the highway to pull into a Pemex. Just as I did, a local taxi tried to pass me on the left, on a solid double line, at easily 60 or 70 kph. I turned right into him as he sped by, clipping the front right side of his taxi with my left front bumper. He went into a sideways skid and only his driving skill prevented his taxi from rolling over. We all pulled over to the side of the highway. The damage to my front bumper was negligible - no worth repairing, on a 10 year old car. His taxi, however, had a deep dent running all the way down the right side , from the front to the back. As a result, he couldn't open either of the doors on the right side.
I used the cabbie's cell phone to call long distance to my insurance company, (a toll-free number, as I recall), whose "agent" arrived about 3 hours later, having driven up from Pochutla in his very beat-up Volkswagen Bug, with no operating headlights. (It was getting dark by then.) He was covered in grease, having apparently been contacted while working on his Bug.
My agent, nor any of the fifteen or so other people, most of them friends of the cabbie, who had gathered along the highway, spoke any English. I was able to converse in my broken Spanish.
My agent insisted that the cabbie was at fault. The cabbie insisted I was at fault. After an hour of haggling, and frustrated that little progress was being made, I suggested we call the police. Exactly at that moment, a federale in his Dodge Charger came along the highway, and stopped to see what the crowd had gathered for. He sauntered over, very John Wayne-like, with his aviator sunglasses and fit-like-a-glove uniform, stood quietly for maybe 5 minutes listening to presentations from my agent and from the cabbie, then shrugged his shoulders, pointed at me, looked me in the eye, and said, in perfect, unaccented English: "Drive safely" - got into his car and drove off.
Long story short, it seemed that the cabbie was most concerned about his lost fares while standing along the highway for about 4 hours. The fact that he couldn't open either right hand door of his taxi didn't seem to concern him - he very likely could get the dent knocked-out cheaply. He seemed finally to accept my agent's insistence that the taxi was at fault. We finally settled that I would pay him 100 pesos for the use of his cell phone, which appeared to satisfy all parties.

Zihua Transit Police

by Pete and Wendy, Saturday, September 16, 2017, 20:49 (67 days ago) @ wisconsinjuan

Touche!

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Zihua Transit Police

by Helene @, Zih, Sunday, September 17, 2017, 08:01 (66 days ago) @ Pete and Wendy

On one of the blogs on Mexico they have a link to print out forms that you can have the Transito's sign. The form has a place for their pictures and numbers. It is 2 pages that the Transito would have to fill out. I's a legal form. It's to combat Mordida.

Zihua Transit Police

by PHIL @, Trinity, NC, Monday, September 18, 2017, 14:46 (65 days ago) @ Helene

Stopped for illegal U turn in Ixtapa past year. Asked if I could buy his lunch and slipped a 100P up the inside of the door and his hand slipped across the open window and `wala` the money disappeared. We both smiled and I went on my merry way.

Zihua Transit Police

by maggy, Monday, September 18, 2017, 18:08 (65 days ago) @ PHIL

when in rome.....
esta sencillo, los refrescos y ya!

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Zihua Transit Police

by jaui @, Zihuatanejo, Monday, September 18, 2017, 22:16 (65 days ago) @ wisconsinjuan

9/18/2017

Excerpt from wisconsinjuan's post 9/16/2017 15:48 --->

What about all the kids in the back of a pickup truck?

Now THAT is a routine practice I see all the time, & a very unsafe one too.
A quick unexpected slamming on of the brakes, & most likely, there will be some ejected people on the street, with serious injuries, if not dead.
People of all ages ride in the back of pickup trucks, (not just kids).

So, that makes me wonder IF there is a transit law related to that practice?

IF there is, then it is permitted due to default, (as is drunk driving), as a result of the routine failure to enforce the corresponding law(s).

--
jaui