Today's Spanish Lesson

by bobnamy @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 16:02 (68 days ago)

Te o Tu.

What is the different meaning of these two terms, and when do I use each one?

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Today's Spanish Lesson

by Talley Ho @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 16:14 (68 days ago) @ bobnamy

"Tu" is a possessive adjective, and it is used to show possession/property or to show a relationship between people and things, ideas or other people. The corresponding English word would be "your." For example tu comida favorita - your favorite food; tu casa - your house.

"Te" can act as either a direct object pronoun or an indirect object pronoun and can be used to convey the idea of "you" in regards to the direct object of a verb or the idea of "to you/for you" when it acts as an indirect object pronoun.

Thanks to Google

Today's Spanish Lesson

by bobnamy @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 16:18 (68 days ago) @ Talley Ho

Thank you! I will work on digesting that.

Today's Spanish Lesson

by Gringo Viejo @, Kansas/Zihuatanejo, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 17:26 (68 days ago) @ Talley Ho

Rally like your explanation. For us chronologically gifted it brings back a lot of memories and we need to "re-learn+ these lessons. And do you remember diagramming sentences-after sentence, after sentence, ad infinitum.

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Today's Spanish Lesson

by Talley Ho @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 17:52 (68 days ago) @ Gringo Viejo

Actually dreamed about that a couple of nights ago.

Today's Spanish Lesson

by bobnamy @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 16:16 (68 days ago) @ bobnamy

Did someone just delete their response?

In any event just to clarify, I frequently see te used where I expect to see tu. As in te is some form of the word "you" but I have never been able to figure out when to use te in that context.

Today's Spanish Lesson

by BobM @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 19:17 (68 days ago) @ bobnamy

There are lots of subtleties in Spanish. Pronouns are used a little differently that in English.

Hopefully a couple of examples will shed some light as to just how different Spanish can be. The language isn't that simple.

For example, "te amo" is a complete sentence and it looks like "te" - you - are doing something. But actually, "Te amo" simply means "I love you."

Two things are going on. First, the subject pronoun is usually omitted in Spanish. Amo is the first person singular of "I love." It is understood that "I" - "Yo" - am the one doing the loving. Te is an object pronoun, and the object pronoun is put before the verb, which is not the way we usually do it in English.

Second example, "Te gusta cerveza" means "You like beer." It looks like "te" is being used as a subject pronoun here. But it's not -- a literal translation of the sentence would be "Beer pleases you." So "te" is an object pronoun. This is how you say "like" in Spanish: the thing you like is the subject and "you" are the object. And the resulting order of the words is the opposite of in English.

Not so easy, right?

Anyway, I apologize if I sound like a schoolteacher. I find Spanish really fascinating.

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Today's Spanish Lesson

by Talley Ho @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 19:31 (68 days ago) @ BobM

And it is, and so is grammar.

Will we see you soon?

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Today's Spanish Lesson

by jaui @, Zihuatanejo, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 22:25 (68 days ago) @ BobM

10/04/2018

Hola BobM

Here's another important detail to know for sounding less like a beginner when speaking Español, that can be confusing.

What I am wondering :badass: about, IF you may know:
Is there a gramatical rule that applies to figure out if a word is "el" or "la"?
I simply just had to memorize which to use.

Examples: la escuela, la ropa, la bicicleta, la Señora, la mesa.....all those end with the letter "a".
el lago, el pago, el dinero, el monedero, el basurero, el asunto, all end in "o".

Here's where the difficulty comes into play:
el sistema, el agua, el área, el problema, el tema, though end with the letter "a" are NOT preceded by "la", and use "el".

Others such as la luz, la educación, la computación, la felicidad, etc., as far as I know, just need to be memorized.
LISTENING TO NATIVE SPEAKERS talk is how I learned those.


B-)

--
jaui

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Today's Spanish Lesson

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Friday, October 05, 2018, 09:36 (67 days ago) @ jaui

10/04/2018

Hola BobM

Here's another important detail to know for sounding less like a beginner when speaking Español, that can be confusing.

What I am wondering :badass: about, IF you may know:
Is there a gramatical rule that applies to figure out if a word is "el" or "la"?
I simply just had to memorize which to use.

Examples: la escuela, la ropa, la bicicleta, la Señora, la mesa.....all those end with the letter "a".
el lago, el pago, el dinero, el monedero, el basurero, el asunto, all end in "o".

Here's where the difficulty comes into play:
el sistema, el agua, el área, el problema, el tema, though end with the letter "a" are NOT preceded by "la", and use "el".

Others such as la luz, la educación, la computación, la felicidad, etc., as far as I know, just need to be memorized.
LISTENING TO NATIVE SPEAKERS talk is how I learned those.


B-)

With regards to feminine nouns preceded by masculine articles such as "el agua" and "el hada": immediately before a singular Spanish noun with initial stressed "a" or "ha" use the articles "el" and "un." But in the plural these remain regular feminine nouns: "las aguas", "las hadas".

But in other cases where there appear to be exceptions you just have to learn the word: "el puente", "la fuente".

You already speak a difficult language grammatically. The rules of grammar in Spanish are much more consistent. We use no split infinitives. Our pronunciation is more consistently phonetic.

One thing I appreciate about Spanish is I can easily read a text from 600 or more years ago because the same rules still apply and the language has changed very little relatively speaking, especially if you understand the differences in Spanish spoken in different countries, whereas trying to read Shakespeare or Chaucer the English is much more difficult to understand for numerous reasons.

Today's Spanish Lesson

by Canadian Rainbirds ⌂ @, Victoria BC and Zihuatanejo, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 22:33 (68 days ago) @ BobM

There are lots of subtleties in Spanish. Pronouns are used a little differently that in English.

Hopefully a couple of examples will shed some light as to just how different Spanish can be. The language isn't that simple.

........

Second example, "Te gusta cerveza" means "You like beer." It looks like "te" is being used as a subject pronoun here. But it's not -- a literal translation of the sentence would be "Beer pleases you." So "te" is an object pronoun. This is how you say "like" in Spanish: the thing you like is the subject and "you" are the object. . . . . .

Be Careful with gustar: Note that "me gusta" should NOT normally be used to refer to a person to say "I like you", or her or him etc. Is can have a sexual connotation!

For persons, use caier, to fall. Nos caimos bien. We get along well. (We fall together well).

Yeah, confusing!

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Daily Spanish Lesson

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Friday, October 05, 2018, 10:01 (67 days ago) @ Canadian Rainbirds

There are lots of subtleties in Spanish. Pronouns are used a little differently that in English.

Hopefully a couple of examples will shed some light as to just how different Spanish can be. The language isn't that simple.

........

Second example, "Te gusta cerveza" means "You like beer." It looks like "te" is being used as a subject pronoun here. But it's not -- a literal translation of the sentence would be "Beer pleases you." So "te" is an object pronoun. This is how you say "like" in Spanish: the thing you like is the subject and "you" are the object. . . . . .


Be Careful with gustar: Note that "me gusta" should NOT normally be used to refer to a person to say "I like you", or her or him etc. Is can have a sexual connotation!

For persons, use caier, to fall. Nos caimos bien. We get along well. (We fall together well).

Yeah, confusing!

I believe you mean to say "caer".
Felipe me cae bien. Me gusta Felipe. (Él es muy simpático) They are both acceptable and say the same thing.

Ideas are what we communicate, words are just the tools, the means, and the idea of "gustarle a alguien" or "gustarle algo" is the same as the English "like someone or something". Same with "Caerle bien". It's only difficult if you don't use it, like any muscle, tool, or skill.

My suggestion is to try to at least watch a half hour of TV a day to develop your hearing skills, and try to read the newspaper daily if possible to look up words and expand your vocabulary. Sports are easy because you already know what they should be saying. News is more difficult and you have to pay closer attention, but again seeing the images often helps you to follow what's going on. Children's programs are always going to be the easiest. When I was starting out I tried to watch the news every day and an old movie as often as possible. Televisa used to play old classics during the afternoon siesta after the news as well as at night on the weekends. Especially the Sunday afternoon movies. Pedro Infante. María Felix. El Indio Fernández. Jorge Negrete. Tin Tan. Resortes. And of course Cantinflas. Once you can understand Cantinflas, you're there.

This is hilarious.

https://youtu.be/z0P-5DCCnfs

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King’s English

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 22:20 (68 days ago) @ bobnamy

It’s a bit of old Middle Ages speak.

Tú is Thou. Tú eres mi amor.(Thou art my love)

Tu is Thy. Tu amor es mío. (Thy love is mine)

Tuyo is Thine. Mi amor es tuyo. (My love is thine)

Te is Thee. Yo te amo. (I love thee)

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King’s English

by Talley Ho @, Thursday, October 04, 2018, 22:28 (68 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

:megusta:

King’s English

by JACK @, Friday, October 05, 2018, 10:00 (67 days ago) @ Talley Ho

And finally, there is only on word in Spanish that is feminine but terminates with the letter "o".
Did you guess it? La mano.
You might say there are others such as la foto but that's short for La fotografía.
Radio can be El radio, the equipment, or La radio, the medium.

King’s English

by Lalo @, Friday, October 05, 2018, 11:36 (67 days ago) @ JACK

And then there is el agua.

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King’s English

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Friday, October 05, 2018, 11:40 (67 days ago) @ Lalo

And then there is el agua.

From my post above:

With regards to feminine nouns preceded by masculine articles such as "el agua" and "el hada": immediately before a singular Spanish noun with initial stressed "a" or "ha" use the articles "el" and "un." But in the plural these remain regular feminine nouns: "las aguas", "las hadas"