Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by Casa Juan @, Thursday, October 31, 2019, 08:17 (20 days ago)

Does one exist in Zihua and if so where can it be found?

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Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Thursday, October 31, 2019, 09:48 (20 days ago) @ Casa Juan

Does one exist in Zihua and if so where can it be found?

You're welcome to go to the Panteón Municipal at Agua de Correa at anytime tomorrow or Saturday to accompany families as they remember their deceased loved ones. Events? This isn't one of those kind of traditions, though bars, hotels and politicians will no doubt do their best to convince you otherwise.

Tonight, tomorrow and the next day all the good little imitators of anglosajón culture will be out looking for foreigners to shout ¡JALOGÜÍN! at hoping for candy or money.

But I expect this is what you're looking for, the Disneyworlding of Día de Muertos:
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Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by Talley Ho @, Playa la Ropa, Thursday, October 31, 2019, 10:21 (20 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

:megusta:

We are heading to town to buy flowers for our altar.

Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by Casa Juan @, Thursday, October 31, 2019, 12:22 (20 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

Gracias

Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by La Reina ⌂ @, Thursday, October 31, 2019, 21:13 (20 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

I, too, worry about the “touristification” of this sacred tradition.

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Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Friday, November 01, 2019, 08:00 (19 days ago) @ La Reina

I, too, worry about the “touristification” of this sacred tradition.

Not just the tourist aspect. I mean, what are we doing here? It looks like we’ve Disneyfied a solemn tradition. Instead of passing these days making a private altar for our lived ones and then spending time with their memories, the purpose of Día de Muertos, now we have a very Halloweenesque party event atmosphere. I get it that tourists want to observe, learn about and even share in the tradition, but now every bar has a party and there are even floor shows at several hotels, very much like they do in Cancún. Xochimilco has a full fledged very Hollywoodish production where they charge admission and turn a profit. Is that the future of Día de Muertos?

As a heathen infidel atheist I have no real skin in this game beyond being respectful of local traditions. I’ve watched this very personal and solemn tradition become quite a circus in Zihuatanejo. I get it that the Anglo-Saxon tourists and inland big city tourists want to celebrate Halloween as well as the little kids unsure which tradition is which, and so there have always been events at several restaurants and bars, but as if on cue last evening just as the “celebrations” were getting underway with big showy public contests for best altars and best Catrinas, a heavy rainstorm broke out and ruined altars and papel picado and brought many outdoor festivities to a halt as folks scurried for shelter and went home. That’ll teach’em. Tlaloc has spoken!
:vivamexico:

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Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by Curly! @, Great Pacific Northwet, Friday, November 01, 2019, 09:30 (19 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

We haven't done it for the last couple of year, since I got sick and am more prone to weakness (it's a lot of work), but for years we've traditionally had a Dia de los Muertos get together at our house. We'd build an alter, and family and friends would bring their images of loved ones passed, to put upon it. Along with ours, of course. It would be a fine feed, and some drinking occurred, but after dinner we'd all gather around the alter and those that chose to would share stories of their loved ones in the pictures. Many laughs, some tears, but always a highly interesting night of learning about each other, and those people who helped carve us into who we are today.

http://www.bickerbros.com/alter.jpg

(the whiteboard is for showing old 8mm home movies, for them what brought them)

--
Curly!

Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by victorio, Friday, November 01, 2019, 13:53 (19 days ago) @ ZihuaRob

Hola
Since I have been coming to Zihua I have also seen the changes in the Dia de Mourtes. Halloween festivities, which take three days here as opposed to one night in northern North America, is mingling with the traditional Dia de Mourtes tradition and making things a more party atmosphere than it should be. Last night there was even an impromptu Halloween "parade", many dressed as Katrina's. The whole street between Calle Nicholas Bravo and Zorro's bar was jammed sidewalk to sidewalk with Halloweeners. If they had all stopped at one of the few places that had treats, it would have been overwhelmed quickly. Too bad the candy wanters are having such an influence.
I, being the ass that I am, smiled when the rains came and saw them scrambling for shelter.

Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by victorio, Friday, November 01, 2019, 22:15 (19 days ago) @ victorio
edited by victorio, Friday, November 01, 2019, 22:21

Hola
Update on my Halloween rant.
Tonight was about the same as last night. Hundreds of candy wanters were everywhere. The really sad thing was seeing all these tiny kids crying and wanting to go home, but mom keep dragging them around looking for more candy. We saw a few moms sticking their hands in their kids treat bag to get candies. Sad. At least there is only one more night of this.

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Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by frostbite ⌂ @, Hamilton MT, Saturday, November 02, 2019, 05:34 (18 days ago) @ victorio

We're very lucky; there have been no candy beggars in our area since we moved here 7 years ago.

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[image]
Casa Amarilla Vacation Rental
http://www.casa-amarilla-zihua.com/

Schedule for Day of the Dead events?

by Ironwood, Sunday, November 03, 2019, 21:33 (17 days ago) @ victorio

Hola
Update on my Halloween rant.
Tonight was about the same as last night. Hundreds of candy wanters were everywhere. The really sad thing was seeing all these tiny kids crying and wanting to go home, but mom keep dragging them around looking for more candy. We saw a few moms sticking their hands in their kids treat bag to get candies. Sad. At least there is only one more night of this.

Interesting posts, especially Rob's. I share his disgust at the "Disneyfication" of Dia de los Muertos. Commercialization taints everything, doesn't it.....from Christmas to Easter, from Mother's Day to St. Valentine's Day, to Halloween and Dia de los Muertos.

Coming from a relatively constipated culture that prefers to deal with death by ignoring it, I am at once fascinated and shocked by the whole idea of Dia de los Muertos. The proliferation of and fascination with skulls and skeletons has got me thinking: where I come from, cremation currently seems to be in vogue, rather than traditional burial. Mexico being a Catholic country, and....I could be wrong....Rome not being enamored with cremation, how common are cremations in Mexico? If cremation becomes as "popular" as it is NOB, will that eventually mean the end of skulls and skeletons as the lingua franca of Dia de los Muertos? Nothing scary, or even all that symbolic, about ashes!

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Día de Muertos en el tiempo de los crematorios

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Sunday, November 03, 2019, 23:47 (16 days ago) @ Ironwood

Hola
Update on my Halloween rant.
Tonight was about the same as last night. Hundreds of candy wanters were everywhere. The really sad thing was seeing all these tiny kids crying and wanting to go home, but mom keep dragging them around looking for more candy. We saw a few moms sticking their hands in their kids treat bag to get candies. Sad. At least there is only one more night of this.


Interesting posts, especially Rob's. I share his disgust at the "Disneyfication" of Dia de los Muertos. Commercialization taints everything, doesn't it.....from Christmas to Easter, from Mother's Day to St. Valentine's Day, to Halloween and Dia de los Muertos.

Coming from a relatively constipated culture that prefers to deal with death by ignoring it, I am at once fascinated and shocked by the whole idea of Dia de los Muertos. The proliferation of and fascination with skulls and skeletons has got me thinking: where I come from, cremation currently seems to be in vogue, rather than traditional burial. Mexico being a Catholic country, and....I could be wrong....Rome not being enamored with cremation, how common are cremations in Mexico? If cremation becomes as "popular" as it is NOB, will that eventually mean the end of skulls and skeletons as the lingua franca of Dia de los Muertos? Nothing scary, or even all that symbolic, about ashes!

Ha! Good one. My first thought when I read your comments was edible or smokable? :smoking: