Saved a turtle!

by mindpilot, la Playa Buenavista, Monday, November 09, 2020, 13:03 (26 days ago)

Wife & I walking down he beach saw a baby turtle high in the sand, dry and not moving. I picked it up, expecting it to be dead, but one flipper lightly pushed against my finger, and it opened its mouth a little. Moved it to the wet sand and and in a few minutes it recovered and started motivating toward the surf. It got tossed around a bit, but after a few tries looks like the little guy made it safely out to sea!:kingtut:

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Saved a turtle!

by Juanita Banana @, Playa Buenavista, Monday, November 09, 2020, 13:05 (26 days ago) @ mindpilot

Viva la tortuga!!:kingtut: :bravo:

--
Juanita

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Saved a turtle!

by Talley Ho @, Playa la Ropa, Monday, November 09, 2020, 13:12 (26 days ago) @ mindpilot

Good for you!!!

There were three late nests on Playa la Ropa this morning and a lot of little guys dashing for the water.

Saved a turtle!

by Casa Juan @, Monday, November 09, 2020, 16:14 (26 days ago) @ Talley Ho

It amazes me that they can somehow continue to survive in an environment that is increasingly spoiled by plastics!

Saved a turtle!

by mindpilot, la Playa Buenavista, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 08:29 (25 days ago) @ Casa Juan

I've read that there is now so much plastic in the environment that virtually every living organism has plastic molecules in its cells. Those long complex hydrocarbon strings that never ever break down into simpler elements, they just get smaller.

Saved a turtle!

by Bill Fun, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 13:59 (25 days ago) @ mindpilot

I think I read that the source for 85% of the plastic marine debris is from 3 Asia countries.

Saved a turtle!

by islandgirl @, Cowichan Valley, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 14:02 (25 days ago) @ Bill Fun

I'm not sure, but I think a lot of that is actually shipped over there from North America to be 'recycled'.

Saved a turtle!

by Bill Fun, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 15:43 (25 days ago) @ islandgirl

Not sure what percentage of Asia's plastic is from mismanaged of U.S. recycled wastes and how much is from their 4.7 billion people. Maybe the Western countries need to more rigorously track and verify for proper recycling like companies monitoring their supply-chain for harsh worker conditions.

Saved a turtle!

by jay @, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 17:21 (25 days ago) @ Bill Fun

Good points. There was a good piece on Frontline just last week on this subject. While a lot of plastic is being recycled, a whole lot more either can't be or isn't, largely because no one knows how to make a profit off of anything but discarded plastic bottles. A lot of the rest is being shipped to companies in Indonesia who thought they could profit. Turns out they can't, even with much lower labor costs. So there the stuff sits, piling up into mountains. It's a serious problem where there are no good short-term answers.

Saved a turtle!

by islandgirl @, Cowichan Valley, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 18:43 (25 days ago) @ jay

Might be something coming down the pipe. Heard about a scientist working with plastic eating bacteria.

Saved a turtle!

by Bill Fun, Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 08:47 (24 days ago) @ islandgirl

I also understand that there is currently an aluminum can shortage in the U.S. and likely other countries since so many people are consuming beverages at home. Thus this also push people towards plastic containers.

Saved a turtle!

by Dougschuler @, Denver, Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 11:09 (24 days ago) @ Bill Fun

In Denver, Ball Container, the largest maker of aluminum cans, is experimenting with a single use aluminum cup to replace the plastic cups used at athletics events. It is cheaper to produce and easier to recycle.

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Saved a turtle!

by qwerty @, Oregon, USA, Thursday, November 12, 2020, 11:53 (23 days ago) @ Bill Fun

I for one welcome an aluminum can shortage. I'm having more and more trouble finding beer in bottles in the stores and I just don't like beer out of a can!

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Saved a turtle!

by Grumpy in Lake Cowichan @, Vancouver Island B.C Canada, Thursday, November 12, 2020, 17:07 (23 days ago) @ qwerty

:megusta:

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Saved a turtle!

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 14:06 (25 days ago) @ Bill Fun

I think I read that the source for 85% of the plastic marine debris is from 3 Asia countries.

Make no mistake. The USA and its disposable culture is the main culprit here.

Saved a turtle!

by mindpilot, la Playa Buenavista, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 20:00 (25 days ago) @ ZihuaRob
edited by mindpilot, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 20:07

Another big culprit is a huge proliferation of single use / single serving packaging that is heavily marketed in developing countries where people don't have the means to buy in bulk. Those places also don't have the infrastructure to collect and "recycle".

I use quotes because most of the plastics used in packaging really cannot be recycled. They are combinations of different types of plastic, other materials like metals and inks and are impossible to separate. At least with current technology.

So those of us who recycle diligently are really just creating another pile of trash that gets shipped to someplace else where it is either simply dumped in the ocean or burned.

Saved a turtle!

by Robbob, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 16:44 (25 days ago) @ Bill Fun

For what is worth...

Article contains a chart of the top ocean polluting countries.

https://www.statista.com/chart/12211/the-countries-polluting-the-oceans-the-most/


The U.S. is #1 in generating plastic waste! :omg:

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/44/eabd0288


An excellent (IMO) Frontline/NPR segment on Plastics. Demonstrates what a huge problem this is...and going to continue to be.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dk3NOEgX7o

Sobering factoid...by 2050 plastic production will triple!

Saved a turtle!

by jay @, Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 17:21 (25 days ago) @ Robbob

Ach! You beat me to it.

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Saved a turtle!

by ZihuaRob ⌂ @, Zihuatanejo, México, Monday, November 09, 2020, 14:11 (26 days ago) @ mindpilot

Wife & I walking down he beach saw a baby turtle high in the sand, dry and not moving. I picked it up, expecting it to be dead, but one flipper lightly pushed against my finger, and it opened its mouth a little. Moved it to the wet sand and and in a few minutes it recovered and started motivating toward the surf. It got tossed around a bit, but after a few tries looks like the little guy made it safely out to sea!:kingtut:

¡Qué buena onda! ¡Muchísimas gracias!

Saved a turtle!

by Ironwood @, Monday, November 09, 2020, 16:37 (26 days ago) @ mindpilot

Wife & I walking down he beach saw a baby turtle high in the sand, dry and not moving. I picked it up, expecting it to be dead, but one flipper lightly pushed against my finger, and it opened its mouth a little. Moved it to the wet sand and and in a few minutes it recovered and started motivating toward the surf. It got tossed around a bit, but after a few tries looks like the little guy made it safely out to sea!:kingtut:

If I've told this story before......but the same thing happened to me a few years ago, on La Ropa. My little baby turtle was so tired, he couldn't get back through the breaking surf, so I took him way out beyond the breakers and let him go. He paddled a few yards, only to be snatched by a cruising frigate bird. Nature can be cruel.