Reddish-brown pottery

by gardengal1, Monday, March 21, 2011, 16:47 (3915 days ago)

Does anyone know if the reddish-brown pottery with the little circles and dots can be put into the oven? I have asked at three different places where it is sold and I am getting different answers. I have used it stovetop without any problem. Thanks. And, Judi, I am on a mission here - two posts!!!

Reddish-brown pottery

by suztamasopo @, Monday, March 21, 2011, 16:51 (3915 days ago) @ gardengal1

I put it in the oven all the time. After all it was fired in an "oven" originally.

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Reddish-brown pottery

by frostbite ⌂ @, Hamilton MT, Monday, March 21, 2011, 17:21 (3915 days ago) @ gardengal1

No reason not to. You could play it safe and put it into a cold oven to start.

Reddish-brown pottery

by locahermanas, Monday, March 21, 2011, 19:40 (3915 days ago) @ gardengal1

I think the history of these pots is that they were originally intended to be placed right on a bed of hot coals, so I'm thinking the oven is NO problem.

Reddish-brown pottery

by judi in OKlahoma, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 08:21 (3913 days ago) @ gardengal1

And, Judi, I am on a mission here - two posts!!!

I say go for it ... until the glaze starts putting off nasty fumes ;-)
Looks like you got some very nasty weather back home. I hope all is well when you get there.
'tis the season
judi in tornado alley

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Reddish-brown pottery

by Zmon01 @, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 19:00 (3913 days ago) @ gardengal1

If it was fired in a kiln, it certainly can go in the oven. If it is glazed in lead-based, I wouldn't eat out of it. 2 questions for you to ask before purchasing?

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Reddish-brown pottery

by frostbite ⌂ @, Hamilton MT, Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 21:09 (3913 days ago) @ Zmon01

If it was fired in a kiln, it certainly can go in the oven. If it is glazed in lead-based, I wouldn't eat out of it. 2 questions for you to ask before purchasing?

As I mentioned earlier, it's OK to put in an oven but, to be safe, put it in a cold oven to avoid shock and cracking. As to glazes containing lead: I'm a potter and don't use these on my wares, but I do - on occasion - eat out of vessels which have been lead-glazed ( but only non-acidic foods) and many people still do on a daily basis, since most low-fired ware in Mexico is still glazed this way. Reasonably inexpensive lead testing kits are available.